4 Words You Need to Keep Off Your PTE Essays (Part 6)

Do you want to get a high score in the PTE writing test? Make proofreading a part of your writing process.

Whenever you answer writing exercises during your PTE review Makati course, make it a point to leave at least three minutes to review your work. Check your capitalizations and punctuations. Make sure your essay has a logical flow of ideas. Shorten or simplify long sentences, fix structure and grammar inconsistencies, and ensure appropriate word choice. Here are four unnecessary words that you need to avoid using in your essays.

PTE review Makati

1. Thru

“Thru” is the informal and simplified spelling of the word “through.” Hence, it has no place in academic essay-writing. Stick to the complete spelling whenever you use this word.

Example:

He ran his fingers thru his hair.

He ran his fingers through his hair.

2. Up and Down

More often than not, integrating these words into a statement creates redundancy. So, keep an eye out for them when you proofread your sentences during your Pearson Test of English Academic review sessions.

Example:

The woman sat down on the chair.

The woman sat on the chair.

3. Totally/Literally/Absolutely/Completely

These adverbs seldom add anything to a statement. Here’s what they mean.

  • Totally – completely, absolutely
  • Literally – exactly; in the most literal sense or manner
  • Absolutely – totally; utterly; without restriction or limitation
  • Completely – in every way; totally; entirely

Don’t use them unless they contribute something to your message. If you see these words when you review your work, delete them and/or paraphrase the sentence.

Example:

She wasn’t entirely sure if she performed well during her last PTE review Makati class.

She wasn’t sure if she performed well during her last PTE review Makati class.

4. Sort/Kind (of)

It’s only acceptable to use these expressions during informal writing and casual conversations—never in academic prose.

It’s better to use “slightly,” “rather,” and “somewhat.”

Example:

The student was sort of disappointed with the test results.

The student was somewhat disappointed with the test results.

Make a list of words that you need to trim off your essay. Consult it every time you finish reviewing your work. Not only will it help you determine, which ones often flew under your radar during your initial review but it’ll also help you remember the words on the list. Use the Find shortcut (CTRL+F) to search for them. Enroll in one of our Pearson Test of English Academic review courses to learn more ways to elevate your essay-writing process.

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